Ten must-see shows at Nuit Blanche 2018

October 1, 2018 § Leave a comment

This year, the all-night art festival expands to Scarborough and takes over the Ontario Science Centre for the first time

BY ROSEMARY HEATHER, SEPTEMBER 25, 2018

Nathan Phillips Square isn’t the only game in town during Nuit Blanche now that the art event is expanding to Scarborough. Photo: Cheol Joon Baek

 

NUIT BLANCHE all over town, Saturday (September 29), sundown to sunrise. Free. nbto.com.


The city as art museum – that’s the basic premise of annual all-night art event Nuit Blanche. Now in its 13th year, and no longer with a big bank title sponsor, Nuit Blanche continues to thrive. This year it’s happening in the wake of the new MOCA’s debut in the Junction, an important milestone for the city’s art scene. Arguably, by showing a broad range of temporary art installations in free yearly events, Nuit Blanche helped create the overflow crowds that enjoyed MOCA’s free opening weekend.

For the first time, Saturday’s event will see a portion of its festivities happening in Scarborough, including a series of artist installations on the Scarborough RT Line (up until October 8). Going city-wide is an excellent way to diversify the ethos of bringing art to the people. This Nuit Blanche is creating the better megacity that Toronto needs right now. Here are 10 must-see exhibitions.

1. PRESERVED – GAYLE CHONG KWAN
City Hall, 100 Queen West

As past editions have proved, making use of City Hall’s underground parking garage adds to the power of the artworks seen there. This UK artist is presenting large-scale photo installations that combine collaged images of early immigrant communities in Toronto, London and New York, “preserved” using the sculptural element of salt.

2. INTERNATIONAL DUMPLING FESTIVAL – KEN LUM
60 Queen West (at James)

Vancouver’s Ken Lum is one of Canada’s best artists. Now decamped to Philadelphia for a prime academic appointment, Lum is creating a night market focusing on dumplings. A range of dumpling cuisines typical of Toronto will be available to buy, each stall also featuring a banner made by Lum in his signature declamatory style.

3. MIRRORS OF BABEL – EL SEED, JAVID JAH, SHALAK ATTACK, TABBAN SOLEIMANI, PLANTA MUSICA, MEDIAH
Yonge-Dundas Square, 1 Dundas East; Line 3 Scarborough (Kennedy Station, Lawrence East Station, Ellesmere Station, Midland Station and Scarborough Centre Station); Scarborough Centre (290 Borough Drive)

The French Tunisian artist eL Seed is known for his spectacular large-scale works that blend graffiti with Arabic calligraphy. For Nuit Blanche, the artist presents murals in Toronto and Scarborough, bookending the work of five local street artists that occupy one station each along the RT line that connects the two locations of the murals.

4. WITHIN – REACHING INTELLIGENT SOULS EVERYWHERE (RISE)
STYLL, Scarborough Civic Centre (loading dock), 150 Borough

A youth-led organization, RISE hosts a popular open mic session on Monday evenings, the largest such event in Toronto. Their special Nuit Blanche edition combines a night-long poetry slam and series of performances with the debut screening of the eponymous documentary film – telling the stories of Scarborough’s communities.

5. STEAM-POWERED STORIES
Ontario Science Centre, 770 Don Mills

For its first Nuit Blanche, the Ontario Science Centre goes all out with activities that include First Nations storytelling, a Nuit Bazaar food market – courtesy the Thorncliffe Park Women’s Collective – and an interactive installation about the immigrant experience by artist Zahra Salek and Yaw Tony. Free shuttles will get you there (and to the Aga Khan Museum) from the ROM.

Daniel Iregui’s two-channel installation FORWARD (2015).

6. DANIEL IREGUI – FORWARD / SMJILK – PASSAGE
OCAD University, 100 McCaul; and the Bata Shoe Museum, 327 Bloor West

Two passage-based installations at different sites. Montreal artist Daniel Iregui’s work invites visitors to walk through an endless tunnel composed of sound and light. The Mississauga-based smjilk similarly uses light and mirrors to create a transformative pathway for visitors at the Bata Museum.

7. MODERNISM ON THE GANGES: RAGHUBIR SINGH PHOTOGRAPHS/#METOO & THE ARTS/THE HOUSE THAT WHITENESS BUILT – DIVYA MEHRA AND AMY FUNG
Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queen’s Park

A chance to do your own Night At The Museum. On view are the ROMs current exhibitions – about Singh, and a show that considers his work in the context of #MeToo accusations against him. The evening also sees debut performances of a collaboration between Fung and Mehra (a writer and artist respectively) that brings an intersectional focus to the iconic Anne Of Green Gables story.

8. ONE SKY – MATT RUSSO AND SYSTEM SOUNDS
Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George

Even if the skies are not clear come Nuit Blanche evening, audiences will be able to hear this project. Astrophysicist Russo is also a musician and collaborates with his SYSTEM Sounds collective to translate the intensity of the stars (brightness and colour) into volume and pitch.

9. STAR MOON WATER STONE – ENSEMBLE JENG YI
Church of the Redeemer, 162 Bloor West

An all-night shamanistic performance by this Korean performing arts company and their friends from the Korean and Japanese performance-art worlds. A combination of theatre, music, drumming and dance evoke traditional Korean rituals of thanksgiving, asking the spirits for their blessings in advance of the coming winter months.

10. GHOST SCHOOL – ST. JOSEPH’S COLLEGE SCHOOL
74 Wellesley West

A member of the Toronto Catholic School system, St. Joe’s is using the occasion of Nuit Blanche to reflect on its history. Images of the school as it existed in its earliest form will be projected onto its former site across the street: the buildings of the MacDonald Block, sleek examples of a late-1960s modernist style.

For more on Nuit Blanche 2018, check out our interview with Lego sculptor Ekow Nimako here.

art@nowtoronto.com | @rosemheather

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10 art shows to be excited about in 2018

January 10, 2018 § Leave a comment

From Yoko Ono and Yayoi Kusama to Indigenous architecture and Nuit Blanche in Scarborough, here are the artists and exhibitions to watch out for this year

BY JANUARY 2, 2018

Yoko Ono

Yoko Ono’s Mend Piece will be part of her exhibition The Riverbed at the Gardiner Museum.

Toronto is gaining in confidence, in part because it is learning to appreciate the ways it isn’t like anywhere else. Visit a city that lacks this town’s remarkable and yet unselfconscious multicultural mix and it is bound to seem hopelessly retrograde.

The starting pointing for some highly influential art careers (Michael Snow, General Idea, Peaches), Toronto looks to be on the cusp of something more broad-based: becoming an influential art scene in its own right that leads by example. Here are the names and exhibitions set to make waves – in the city and beyond – in the year ahead.

CARL MARIN AND VERONIKA PAUSOVA
Franz Kaka, January 11 to February 3

Interesting things happen in this small basement space that’s home to not one but two art galleries that alternate shows. (Towards is the name of the other venture.) Sculptures by Marin and beguiling paintings by Pausova bring together geometric abstraction and surrealist figuration.

HERE WE ARE HERE: BLACK CANADIAN CONTEMPORARY ART
Royal Ontario Museum, January 27 to April 11

The ongoing dialogue between Toronto’s cultural institutions and artists about what Canadian identity looks like today includes earlier efforts at the Art Gallery of Ontario, Art Museum at U of T and the Aga Khan. This presentation at the ROM of works by nine African-Canadian artists features Sandra Brewster, Michèle Pearson Clarke and Chantal Gibson.

YOKO ONO’S THE RIVERBED
Gardiner Museum, February 22 to June 3

At 84, the artist, musician and social activist is a marvel for her ability to keep the language of conceptual art, which she helped to pioneer, relevant. Small gestures like the chance to mend broken crockery create moments for quiet and contemplation. Accompanying the show is a thoughtful slate of Ono-inspired programming featuring music, lectures and performance art.

YAYOI KUSAMA’S INFINITY MIRRORS
Art Gallery of Ontario, March 3 to May 27

Art exhibitions that are genuine events happen too rarely in the city. This show, already an international Instagram sensation, gives Toronto a chance to abandon its cool – and the frenzy has already started. Step inside the kaleidoscopic refractions of a Kusama Infinity Room and get an experience of the sublime not based in nature.

NANCY PATERSON’S THE FUTURE, BEFORE
InterAccess, March 7 to May 5

For its 35th anniversary, this organization for art and technology moves from Ossington to a new, bigger location at 950 Dupont. First up are works by veteran media artist Nancy Paterson, a timely exhibition showcasing this early contributor to discourse about the internet and cyber feminism.

NADIA BELERIQUE
Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens, April 8 to June 3

After getting some significant exposure abroad in two major group exhibitions, this will be the first solo show in a museum for the Toronto-based artist. Belerique forges her own unique aesthetic language by using sculptural installation to reflect on the 2D vocabulary of photography.

UNCEDED: VOICES OF THE LAND
2018 Venice Architecture Biennale, May 26 to November 25

Renowned Canadian architect Douglas Cardinal and Indigenous co-curators Gerald McMaster (of OCAD University) and David Fortin are taking a team of 18 First Nations designers from Turtle Island (Canada and the U.S.) to Venice. Storytelling is a key component of Indigenous culture and will be used as a framework for looking at architecture and its related issues – like habitat and stewardship.

HELEN CHO’S YOU REMAINED DISMEMBERED
Trinity Square Video, summer 2018

Cho presents a new video work from a series made with Tai Lam – a fast food worker who came here as a refugee from Vietnam – combined together with words from the video “re-imagined as poetry,” and sculptural works made with vinyl, salt dough and ceramics.

NUIT BLANCHE IN SCARBOROUGH
September 29

This year begins the era of the multipolar Nuit Blanche. A portion of the annual all-night event will move outside the core to the east end. The shift recognizes that the vibrancy of the city is not exclusive to its downtown. Participants include Ghana’s Ibrahim Mahama, known for his use of draped jute sacks as a sculptural material.

UNTITLED ART TV SHOW
To be announced

This has yet to be confirmed, but there have been rumblings that a major broadcast network is working on a documentary series focused on artists who call this city home and those who hail from here and are forging significant careers elsewhere. Purportedly hosted by a local talent and ex-child actor who boasts a Degrassi: The Next Generation credit on his resumé.

art@nowtoronto.com | @rosemheather

https://nowtoronto.com/art-and-books/art/ten-art-exhibitions-to-be-exicted-about-2018/

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